27th July, 2014

eskapismus:

nigerianheir:

couple pictures I found of life in 1956 in the South

most of these are from my hometown and it hurts so bad to see it. but we need to see it.

Our parents were probably alive when this happened. Our grandparents probably helped perpetuate it. We are not so removed that we can afford to ignore it. eskapismus:

nigerianheir:

couple pictures I found of life in 1956 in the South

most of these are from my hometown and it hurts so bad to see it. but we need to see it.

Our parents were probably alive when this happened. Our grandparents probably helped perpetuate it. We are not so removed that we can afford to ignore it. eskapismus:

nigerianheir:

couple pictures I found of life in 1956 in the South

most of these are from my hometown and it hurts so bad to see it. but we need to see it.

Our parents were probably alive when this happened. Our grandparents probably helped perpetuate it. We are not so removed that we can afford to ignore it. eskapismus:

nigerianheir:

couple pictures I found of life in 1956 in the South

most of these are from my hometown and it hurts so bad to see it. but we need to see it.

Our parents were probably alive when this happened. Our grandparents probably helped perpetuate it. We are not so removed that we can afford to ignore it. eskapismus:

nigerianheir:

couple pictures I found of life in 1956 in the South

most of these are from my hometown and it hurts so bad to see it. but we need to see it.

Our parents were probably alive when this happened. Our grandparents probably helped perpetuate it. We are not so removed that we can afford to ignore it. eskapismus:

nigerianheir:

couple pictures I found of life in 1956 in the South

most of these are from my hometown and it hurts so bad to see it. but we need to see it.

Our parents were probably alive when this happened. Our grandparents probably helped perpetuate it. We are not so removed that we can afford to ignore it. eskapismus:

nigerianheir:

couple pictures I found of life in 1956 in the South

most of these are from my hometown and it hurts so bad to see it. but we need to see it.

Our parents were probably alive when this happened. Our grandparents probably helped perpetuate it. We are not so removed that we can afford to ignore it. eskapismus:

nigerianheir:

couple pictures I found of life in 1956 in the South

most of these are from my hometown and it hurts so bad to see it. but we need to see it.

Our parents were probably alive when this happened. Our grandparents probably helped perpetuate it. We are not so removed that we can afford to ignore it. eskapismus:

nigerianheir:

couple pictures I found of life in 1956 in the South

most of these are from my hometown and it hurts so bad to see it. but we need to see it.

Our parents were probably alive when this happened. Our grandparents probably helped perpetuate it. We are not so removed that we can afford to ignore it. eskapismus:

nigerianheir:

couple pictures I found of life in 1956 in the South

most of these are from my hometown and it hurts so bad to see it. but we need to see it.

Our parents were probably alive when this happened. Our grandparents probably helped perpetuate it. We are not so removed that we can afford to ignore it.

eskapismus:

nigerianheir:

couple pictures I found of life in 1956 in the South

most of these are from my hometown and it hurts so bad to see it. but we need to see it.

Our parents were probably alive when this happened.

Our grandparents probably helped perpetuate it.

We are not so removed that we can afford to ignore it.

(via )

27th July, 2014

vvankinq:

Go on, tell them I ate your homework. They’ll never believe you.


I once had an absolute hard-ass of a teacher in high school, who told us that “the dog ate my homework” was NOT a valid excuse. I also had a dog who loathed the smell of glue. So this teacher assigns an assignment: a collage. I work like a fiend on this thing. It’s PERFECT. I am the fucking Caravaggio of collages. I leave it on the floor to grab a drink. I come downstairs and there’s Lucky, popping a squat and taking a luxurious piss on my finally finished project. It’s due in the am. I want to cry, but refuse to let my dog win. So I gingerly slip this collage into a plastic bag, reeking of piss and everything.  I take it in to class. When I see this teacher, I explain the circumstances. She says, “if I told you at the beginning of the term that “the dog ate my homework” is not a valid excuse, what makes you think this is?” I reply, “I thought you might say that”, and drop the suspiciously soggy plastic bag on her desk. One whiff and she have me a four day extension.

vvankinq:

Go on, tell them I ate your homework. They’ll never believe you.

I once had an absolute hard-ass of a teacher in high school, who told us that “the dog ate my homework” was NOT a valid excuse.

I also had a dog who loathed the smell of glue.

So this teacher assigns an assignment: a collage. I work like a fiend on this thing. It’s PERFECT. I am the fucking Caravaggio of collages.

I leave it on the floor to grab a drink. I come downstairs and there’s Lucky, popping a squat and taking a luxurious piss on my finally finished project.

It’s due in the am. I want to cry, but refuse to let my dog win. So I gingerly slip this collage into a plastic bag, reeking of piss and everything.

I take it in to class.

When I see this teacher, I explain the circumstances. She says, “if I told you at the beginning of the term that “the dog ate my homework” is not a valid excuse, what makes you think this is?”

I reply, “I thought you might say that”, and drop the suspiciously soggy plastic bag on her desk.

One whiff and she have me a four day extension.

(Source: awwww-cute)

(via Probably not what you think)

27th July, 2014

slackmistress:

bethanysworld:

fightingforanimals:

Veronika Scott was a fashion student at the College for Creative Studies in Detroit when her teacher, Stephen Schock, challenged her class to create a product that filled a need, rather than satisfying or creating a fad. Veronika’s design was a coat for homeless people that could transform into a sleeping bag, since in her city, she says, “you are constantly faced with the homeless epidemic.” Not only did her design win a International Design Excellence Award from the Industrial Designers Society of America, it’s become the core of Veronika’s nonprofit organization, The Empowerment Plan, which hires people from homeless shelters and transition homes to help her make the coats. Now, three years later, the 24-year-old social entrepreneur expects that her team of 15 seamstresses will produce over 6,000 coats in 2014 — all of which will be distributed free of charge to people living on the streets. Veronika originally designed the coats seeking input from people at a homeless shelter. After receiving feedback from people who used the prototype over a Detroit winter, she refined the design to create her final version which, in addition to being a waterproof and windproof coat and sleeping bag, also transforms into an over-the-shoulder bag with storage in the arm sockets. When she started out, Veronika states,

“Everybody told me that my business was going to fail — not because of who I was giving my product to but because of who I was hiring. They said that these homeless women will never make more than a peanut butter and jelly sandwich — you cannot rely on them for anything. And I know my ladies enjoy proving everybody wrong.” 

And, their impact is growing — according to CNN, which recently honored Veronika as one of their 10 Visionary Women of 2014, “The Empowerment Plan expects to launch a ‘buy one, give one’ program that will make it sustainable beyond the donations and sponsorships that keep it running now. Hunters and backpackers who’ve asked to buy the coat will be able to do so, and the Empowerment Plan will still create coats for homeless people who need them.”Veronika is also excited to show other clothing producers that local manufacturing is possible: “I think we’re going to show a lot of people: you think it’s outdated to do manufacturing in your neighborhood, but I think it’s something that we have to do in the future, where it’s sustainable, where you invest in people, where they’re not interchangeable parts.”You can read more about Veronika’s organization on CNN, or watch a short video about her work here.To learn more about The Empowerment Plan or how you can support their work, visit http://www.empowermentplan.org/For a wonderful book about women’s great inventions throughout history, check out “Girls Think of Everything” for readers 8 to 13.For those in the US who would like to support efforts to end homelessness and help the over 600,000 people who experience homelessness on any given night, visit the National Alliance to End Homelessness athttp://www.naeh.org/ or to find a local homeless shelter to support in your area, visit http://www.homelessshelterdirectory.org/

Important in so many ways.

This is amazing and wonderful.

slackmistress:

bethanysworld:

fightingforanimals:

Veronika Scott was a fashion student at the College for Creative Studies in Detroit when her teacher, Stephen Schock, challenged her class to create a product that filled a need, rather than satisfying or creating a fad. Veronika’s design was a coat for homeless people that could transform into a sleeping bag, since in her city, she says, “you are constantly faced with the homeless epidemic.” 

Not only did her design win a International Design Excellence Award from the Industrial Designers Society of America, it’s become the core of Veronika’s nonprofit organization, The Empowerment Plan, which hires people from homeless shelters and transition homes to help her make the coats. Now, three years later, the 24-year-old social entrepreneur expects that her team of 15 seamstresses will produce over 6,000 coats in 2014 — all of which will be distributed free of charge to people living on the streets. 

Veronika originally designed the coats seeking input from people at a homeless shelter. After receiving feedback from people who used the prototype over a Detroit winter, she refined the design to create her final version which, in addition to being a waterproof and windproof coat and sleeping bag, also transforms into an over-the-shoulder bag with storage in the arm sockets. 

When she started out, Veronika states,

“Everybody told me that my business was going to fail — not because of who I was giving my product to but because of who I was hiring. They said that these homeless women will never make more than a peanut butter and jelly sandwich — you cannot rely on them for anything. And I know my ladies enjoy proving everybody wrong.” 

And, their impact is growing — according to CNN, which recently honored Veronika as one of their 10 Visionary Women of 2014, “The Empowerment Plan expects to launch a ‘buy one, give one’ program that will make it sustainable beyond the donations and sponsorships that keep it running now. Hunters and backpackers who’ve asked to buy the coat will be able to do so, and the Empowerment Plan will still create coats for homeless people who need them.”

Veronika is also excited to show other clothing producers that local manufacturing is possible: “I think we’re going to show a lot of people: you think it’s outdated to do manufacturing in your neighborhood, but I think it’s something that we have to do in the future, where it’s sustainable, where you invest in people, where they’re not interchangeable parts.”

You can read more about Veronika’s organization on CNN, or watch a short video about her work here.

To learn more about The Empowerment Plan or how you can support their work, visit http://www.empowermentplan.org/

For a wonderful book about women’s great inventions throughout history, check out “Girls Think of Everything” for readers 8 to 13.

For those in the US who would like to support efforts to end homelessness and help the over 600,000 people who experience homelessness on any given night, visit the National Alliance to End Homelessness athttp://www.naeh.org/ or to find a local homeless shelter to support in your area, visit http://www.homelessshelterdirectory.org/

Important in so many ways.

This is amazing and wonderful.

(via Stark Raving Sane)

27th July, 2014

to-grow-a-plant asks:

I mean who doesn't like/admire/support women with shit policies? I think Sarah Palin and Michelle Bachman are blithering idiots/racists but I will always uplift women because that's just what feminism and sisterhood are about. ScarJo might be a fascist, Zionist cretin, but she's still allowed to have cellulite!

differentrealms:

biryani-barbie:

thisbeatisproblematic:

appropriately-inappropriate:

Agreed. I’ve gone to bat for Anne Coulter and Shirley Phelps when they were getting insulted based on appearances, for god’s sake, and those are two women who I wouldn’t piss on to put out a fire.

I can disagree with someone vehemently, and still defend them against toxic beauty standards. It’s not comfortable, but it’s not conditional.

If I say I support women, then I support them all, whenever I can, to the best of my ability. If I wanted choosey-choice shit, I’d have stayed libfem.

Defend racists against cellulite! !!!!! :)

white feminists are such trash

Yeah I literally thought this was a joke this is garbage trash waste refuge ready for curbside pickup what the hell

Not actually white, first of all, and if you can’t figure out that I’m not defending them so much as critiquing the system that would reduce their points to “Mann Coulter” and the like, then your analysis is nowhere near as deep as you’d like to think.

They’re awful people. ScarJo supports awful positions. Ann Coulter is a racist little xenophobe and Shirley Phelps would see me dead and buried and picket my funeral if she was given half the opportunity.

I will engage them on those points, on the failures of their reasoning and rhetoric, but I won’t allow a male-dominated industry to reduce those points to puerile jabs about whether Ann Coulter has an Adam’s apple or if ScarJo has a “hellish body”.

Cmon.

(via )

27th July, 2014

shamelesslyunladylike asks:

Wow, I can't believe people are still giving you crap for the whole ScarJo thing. I can't tell if this is an excuse to bash you or if it's a request for permission to bash _some_women with basis on their womanhood. Like "hey, can I be a liiiiittle misogynistic if this woman is bad enough"? No, you fucking can't. Bush, Abbot and Putin are all terrible people but I don't see anyone giving them shit because of them not being conventionally pretty enough.

PRECISELY, and thank you.

The rhetoric I’ve seen, saying women of ANY political stripe “belong in a condom reservoir”, like, is this radical feminist language now? I didn’t sign up for that.

I deliberately mentioned two women who pose personal and direct threats to me, in order to illustrate the seriousness of my resolve.

I can engage their points. Phelps is a religious fanatic whose messages have contributed to a world of hurt in the lgbt community. Coulter is a Randian Republican xenophobe. Both of them have souls you’d need the Hadron Collider to find.

/Lets/ engage on their points. /Lets/ tear them to shred on the merits of their arguments. We can. Their arguments hold no water. But to critique them because they don’t look /pretty/?

Or to allow some mainstream media tabloid owned, run, edited and written by a man, to call a woman’s body hellish and that anyone who could find her attractive is sociopathic?
When the woman in question is smaller and fits more of the Western canon of beauty than any of us here right now, and undoubtedly to any girl reading at home?

What message does that send to girls? How many girls would read that headline and then look down at their thighs, thick with cellulite? Or grab a handful of their belly and wonder who could ever love a fat whale like her?

These thinks are LINKED. They are directly linked. It affects every girl who reads it, and affects young woc more because they’ll NEVER achieve it, they’ll never ever be Disney Beautiful. THAT’S what that headline says to them.

So why are we pretending it doesn’t? I don’t understand.

She argues that I shouldn’t reblog it because worse is happening to women and girls in the Gaza Strip.
By that definition, none of us should be reblogging that post about the Black ballerinas being told their bodies aren’t good enough for ballet, because how can that hope to compare with the horrors the kidnapped Nigerian school-girls are facing? If we can’t focus on the trivial, then why are we all reblogging Michfest defences, when lesbians are still being murdered and correctively raped? Ballet and music festivals are trivial, Western, issues. Yet, She reblogged both. Why do these merit discussion, and not a magazine article that rips a woman’s body to shreds?

What’s the criteria? What am I missing here?

27th July, 2014

to-grow-a-plant asks:

I mean who doesn't like/admire/support women with shit policies? I think Sarah Palin and Michelle Bachman are blithering idiots/racists but I will always uplift women because that's just what feminism and sisterhood are about. ScarJo might be a fascist, Zionist cretin, but she's still allowed to have cellulite!

thisbeatisproblematic:

appropriately-inappropriate:

Agreed. I’ve gone to bat for Anne Coulter and Shirley Phelps when they were getting insulted based on appearances, for god’s sake, and those are two women who I wouldn’t piss on to put out a fire.

I can disagree with someone vehemently, and still defend them against toxic beauty standards. It’s not comfortable, but it’s not conditional.

If I say I support women, then I support them all, whenever I can, to the best of my ability. If I wanted choosey-choice shit, I’d have stayed libfem.

Defend racists against cellulite! !!!!! :)

No, and I’ll thank you not to trivialize my argument like that, when I’ve made it clear I’m not defending them so much as critiquing the system that feels that insulting a woman based on her appearance is in any way appropriate.

I’ve made it clear that I vehemently dislike those women. Ann Coulter would see my ass deported, and Shirley Phelps would see it in the ground. That’s why I brought those two up as examples, because I am directly affected by their rhetoric.

However, when someone says “Ann Coulter looks like a man”, what they’re saying has much deeper implications than a simple comment on appearance.

Can we agree that beauty culture here in the West is toxic and openly harmful to women and girls? Can we also agree that reducing women to their appearances is the first step in a process of objectification and delegitimization of their points and positions?

I’m sure we can, or at least, any radical feminist would say so.

But if we agree with the above, how can we not argue against it, regardless of who it attacks?

Look: I hate those two women as much as I can hate anyone, and I’m sure they’d feel the same about me if they knew I existed.
But I’m not going to reduce their hatred and the threat they pose to some bad joke about Coulter being a trans woman or any shit like that, because that’s the easy way out.

Their points and rhetoric are awful. They should be held accountable for that. Trivializing it by making cheap shots at their appearance doesn’t solve the argument, it doesn’t even address it.

Address their points, not their appearance. It’s as simple as that.

(via tomar matha)

27th July, 2014

Anonymous asks:

friend of mine once made a "joke" about selling his (mtf trans) daughter for three goats and a cow... dude. the kind of people who would buy a woman for livestock expect to get a WOMAN. Being treated like livestock you can trade is a thing that happens to WOMEN, who have UTERUSES, that's the whole point of doing it. And tumblr wants to come along and compare oppressions now?

Man, that kind of nonsense is always in bad taste, but you’re right.

Things like that DO exist for some women. Or sold into marriage to pay a debt. Or any other myriad of horrors that face young women at home and abroad.

It’s awful, and in poor taste.

27th July, 2014

(via the musings of a jaded trans girl)